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John Bourne’s Coloured Cheshire Cheese

This new version of Coloured Cheshire cheese is made at Malpas on the Cheshire and Welsh boarders by John Bourne who’s family have been making cheese since 1750 and since the early 1900’s on the same farm at The Bank on the outskirts of Malpas 

£1.70

Quantity: 100g

Quantity: 100g

Ingredients: Cheese; Milk (Cow, Goat, Buffalo or Ewe’s Milk), Salt, Starter Culture, Bacteria, Rennet, Annatto. Decoration may contain Fruit, Nuts and Foliage.

For allergens, please see ingredients.

Product Description

Until the mid 19th century Cheshire cheeses were matured to varying ages, usually around 6 to 8 month,  and hardness to withstand the rigours of transport, by horse and cart to various nearby markets and then on to  London where it was popular with the gentry and featured on the menus of the leading London clubs of the time. 

Cheshire cheese makers were, at one point encouraged to make 3 types of cheese to match the aspects of milk quality over each milking  season: Early ripening (2-6 weeks), Medium ripening (2-4 months), and Long Keeping (6 -12 months). The recipe for each type was different, with varying volumes of moisture left in the curd. Over time fewer cheesemakers made Long Keeping cheeses and by 1923 the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries provided detailed recipes for Medium Ripening Cheshire cheese in its cheese bulletins, with only a quick note of the other two styles.

This new version of Coloured Cheshire cheese is made at Malpas on the Cheshire and Welsh boarders by John Bourne who’s family have been making cheese since 1750 and since the early 1900’s on the same farm at The Bank on the outskirts of Malpas 

Each cheese is made with pasteurised milk from both morning and evening milk and vegetarian rennet by John Bourne and his head cheese maker Paul who lovingly mix the starter and rennet to the Friesian milk before heating it in open vats thus allowing the curds and whey to form.  The whey is then drained off, some to provide calf feed and some to make butter with whilst the curds are cut by hand and then pressed into cylindrical moulds for 36 hours before being allowed to mature for up to 12 months. 

Each cheese is encased in wax to prevent moisture loss and to keep the cheese crumbly and true to its traditional taste which should be slightly salty due to the vast deposits of salt found underneath the Cheshire grasslands.

Coloured Cheshire Cheese should have a light straw hue and this particular cheese is a prime example of what a coloured cheese should look like. A gentle and sparse addition of Annatto, an orange-red food colouring derived from seeds of the Achiote Tree is added to the milk prior to the pasteurising process. Originally it is  thought that Annatto was added to colour cheese in order to enhance appearance and the belief that the cows were eating good quality pasture grass thus increasing the butterfat quantity in the milk.